Addition.

English: I took this picture in my kitchen, wi...

A collection of dice (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Supplies

  • A pair of dice
  • Chalk
  • Driveway, sidewalk, or other clear spot

Instructions

  • Draw 12 circles on driveway, numbering them from 1 to 12. They can be the same size or different sizes, the same shape or different shapes
  • Roll dice
  • Add the dice
  • Hop the number on the two dice, either each one at a time or the sum
  • Start over with each roll
  • Optional: change the way you hop: step, skip, jump backwards, use one foot or two feet, use left foot, then right foot, hold a toy, raise your hands in the air
  • Optional: in a variation of hopscotch, toss a small rock to the number that is the sum of the dice
  • Optional: Add more dice. For each one you add, add six circles to the driveway drawing

What Should Happen?

With practice adding the number of dots on the two dice, grandchildren will get very familiar with addition of numbers 1 through 12.

The physical activity not only makes it fun, it solidifies, with muscle memory, how numbers add up.

How Is This Useful?

Addition of numbers between one and 12 is an early math activity for first graders. First graders learn to get comfortable with numbers with activities using objects, pencil and paper and games. Preparing your grandchildren with an easy hopscotch game solidifies this skill.

Make your own sidewalk chalk by mixing one cup of warm water with as much tempera paint as you need for the color you want and 2 cups of plaster of paris. Pour the mixture into a waxed-paper-lined toilet paper tube, let dry and peel off the toilet paper tube. Makes at least six.

To see the full instructions for sidewalk chalk, order Rosie O’Donnell’s Crafy.U: 100 Easy Projects the Whole Family Can Enjoy All Year Long, a  book of crafts for children from amazon. Or click on the image below to go directly to the amazon page to get the book.


 

 

Thanks to learnplayimagine.com for this activity.

 This post was first published as a guest post on grandmotherdiaries.com. Thanks, Cheryl!

 

Carol Covin, Granny-Guru

Author, “Who Gets to Name Grandma? The Wisdom of Mothers and Grandmothers”

http://newgrandmas.com

 

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